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The Law Office of Laura A. Olson, P.A. Proudly Serving The Tampa Community
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Tampa Contested Divorce Attorney

Going through a divorce is difficult under any circumstances, but it can be particularly complicated when you know that you will have a contested divorce. It is important to know that you can seek legal representation, and a dedicated Florida divorce attorney can advocate for you every step of the way through divorce litigation. Yet it is also important to know that it may be possible to have an uncontested divorce even when you start out with a contested divorce. Contact our experienced Tampa contested divorce attorney today to learn more about options for moving forward with a contested divorce in Florida.

What is Contested Divorce in Tampa?

Divorces in Florida are either contested or uncontested. With an uncontested divorce in Florida, the parties have come to an agreement about every single issue in the case, including the division of marital assets and debts, spousal support or maintenance, time-sharing and child custody, and child support. If the parties remain in disagreement about even a single issue, they will have a contested divorce.

What is the difference between an uncontested and a contested divorce? In general, an uncontested divorce tends to go much more quickly and to cost the parties significantly less money since there is no need for both sides to present their cases before a judge. Instead, through a mutual agreement, the parties can get divorced without the need for litigation. However, with a contested divorce, it is necessary to present your side of the case to a judge, and the other party will do the same. After hearing from both sides, the judge will make a decision and will create a court order that reflects their decision. Divorce litigation tends to take more time because you must schedule court hearings, and more than one hearing may be necessary. In addition, it tends to cost more money since attorneys for both parties need to prepare for court and to argue before a judge.

Can I Change a Contested Divorce in Tampa?

Even if you and your spouse currently disagree about one or more issues in your divorce, a contested divorce is not inevitable. To be clear, a divorce can go from being a contested divorce to an uncontested divorce if the parties are able to come to an agreement. There are a couple of key ways this can happen.

First, you can consider collaborative divorce. It is important to understand that collaborative divorce is a specific type of process that involves working together to reach an agreement and understanding, and it is only available to parties who are willing to enter into a particular agreement for a collaborative case. As such, if your ex is unwilling to budge, collaborative divorce may not be possible.

Second, you can consider a form of alternative dispute resolution (ADR). Most often, parties who are likely to have a contested divorce will go to mediation. Mediation is a type of ADR that involves a neutral third party known as a mediator who helps to guide discussion and negotiation between the parties. If the parties can reach an agreement through mediation, they can have an uncontested divorce and will not need to have a judge decide any disputes. If they cannot reach an agreement, it is important to know that mediation is never binding, and the case can move onto litigation.

Contact The Law Office of Laura A. Olson, P.A. Today

If you have questions about contested and uncontested divorces, or you want help resolving divorce disputes, you should seek advice from a lawyer in Florida. Contact our experienced Tampa contested divorce attorney today.

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